Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Perfection – you are far far from me! (Like, I can’t even see you from here!)


In a semi-serious extension of Rita Stella Galieh’s proofing blog (below) I want to take the opportunity to admit that I am far from perfect. This will not be a great surprise to those who know me. They are perpetually reminded that I am not perfect, but this week highlighted just how imperfect I am.
Without going into the grisly details of this revelation, I will just say that proofing is not my thing, and I was reminded of that fact. I am not what you would call, a details person. I am happiest in a creative state where stories flow easily and characters come to life, not in the tedious world of correct spelling, punctuation, and picking up mistakes.
Don’t get me wrong – I know that to be a better writer I must strive to work hard on the technical aspects of the craft. It just seems that I never quite get there. I lack the talent and aptitude for it. So in my state of distress over a troublesome issue I flicked onto this Christian Writer’s Downunder blog and read Rita’s post (below).
I laughed and laughed, and I realized that I am not alone (bless you, Rita). There are others out there like me. What a relief. Then I had a great revelation. Instead of beating myself up over my lack of proofing ability I need to concentrate on improving my mistake catching eye, and get to know a few more proofing geniuses willing to check my work. Because at the end of the day – it’s far better to giggle when we find these things, not proclaim the end of the world.    

Rose Dee is the author of the 'Resolution' series. Her latest release is 'A New Resolution'; the third and final book in the series. 

Visit Rose at: http://rosedee.com/

15 comments:

  1. Oh, those proofing geniuses are worth every morsel of chocolate we can award them :)

    Thanks for the honesty, Rose. (And I just LOVE that head shot. What a beautiful smile!) xx

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    1. Ah, chocolate - the universal currency. They certainly are worth it.
      Thank you for your lovely compliment.I am generally one to avoid the camera, Dorothy, but this was a professional shot and I think he found my 'good' side. Lol.

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  2. Loved your post Rose. And loved your giggles. I am fully with you. I think laughter's called for when our mistakes or weaknesses are uncovered. I do love refining my work and checking for mistakes - but you know - sometimes my eyes seem to play me out and seem to insert a word that should be there but isn't - or doesn't show me the extra full stop or whatever. Which is all the more reason why getting the critique and eyes of others are needed.

    As Dotti said - it's a lovely photo Rose. I love your beautiful smile! A Rose indeed. :)
    Blessings,
    Anusha

    PS Keep that laughter going Rose! :)

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    1. There are times I really get mortified over something I have missed, Anusha. But that passes and I can see the funny side. We are all human - after all.

      I was recently exclaiming that stress had given me a few more wrinkles - but my husband reminded me that wrinkles only go where the smiles have been. So I determine to smile away. :)

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  3. Hi Rose,
    Just remember that without the creativity and flowing ideas that you mentioned as your strong points, there would be nothing to proof :)
    Blessings,
    Paula

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    1. A very timely reminder for me, Paula. I have been so caught up in the world of proofing and editing lately and I need to get back into the fun of creating stories and characters. xx

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  4. We're all with you, Rose! After all, the story's the thing as they say. You can be technically perfect but the plot or characters can be flat. H-o-w-e-v-e-r we can't relax in our writing when the editor's eagle eyes are at work.

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    1. I agree, Rita. There have been times when an aspect of a story makes complete sense to me - but the editor is confused by it. We need people to question our work - because it makes it better.

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  5. The trouble is we see what we expect to see not what's actually there. I think it's something a few of us struggle with.

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    1. Really simple things, Dale - like the word 'then' that should be 'that', but we read what we know SHOULD be there instead of what IS there. It's so easy to do.

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  6. What astounds me is that even after several pairs of eyes have gone over a manuscript, one fresh pair of proofing eyes can still find more mistakes!

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    1. I know, Amanda. Even after multiple 'fresh' eyes read it. I think that is why a lot of first editions have mistakes - even famous novels.

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  7. I so agree Rose, and it's important that we can see the funny side of it. Sometimes a proof reader picks up something that becomes SO obvious to me later that I can only laugh at my missing it. But isn't it wonderful that we have these people who can use this skill for us, and who do it so graciously, without making us feel like a twit. Writers, editors, proof readers, publishers - we all need each other and isn't that a great thing.

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    1. Yes, Carol - And without them our writing will never improve and our talent will never grow. I am so grateful to all of them - and the first to admit that I really need their help.

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