Friday, November 2, 2012

Using the ‘Wright’ Word.


After I complained of a sore shoulder two nights ago, my six-year-old proclaimed that he would give me a massage. He raced out of the room and returned within minutes carrying a few objects, one of which was a box of Kleenex. This confused me and I told him we didn’t need tissues. He replied; ‘Yes we do – that’s for the deep tissue part of the massage.’
I giggled softly to myself while I thought of a way to explain his mistake. I wanted to let him down gently and not make him feel foolish, because he enjoyed helping and was always the first to come to my aid. A gentle approach formulated in my mind as he stuffed tissues in between my toes.
Later it occurred to me that the situation with my six-year-old was not dissimilar to the one I regularly find myself in. I have a knack for using the wrong word to describe something. Just ask my neighbour who listens as I read my manuscripts aloud. She often stops me and gently says; ‘I think you meant to use....’, and we have a good giggle about the incorrectness of the word I did use.
I suspect it is a case of my brain running faster than my hand (or mouth for that matter). I know what I mean, and it doesn’t always occur to me that others don’t. Of course, when the fault is pointed out to me, I wonder at how I could have made the mistake in the first place, or how I missed that obvious proofing error.
There is also the excuse that this happens to everyone, (not just six-year-olds with a limited knowledge of physiology, and thirty-something sleep deprived mothers on a writing roll). I recently found a very obvious mistake in a reputable publication. The incorrect use of the word: ‘their’, instead of ‘there’. It struck me as being unprofessional until I remembered that I was as human as they come in these matters. Then, it was a relief to know I wasn’t the only one who, despite professional editing and proofing, had faults that slipped through the cracks.
I have also known some people who are pedantic about precise word usage. That is, until they find themselves in a proper punctuation pickle, or like a review I once read that criticised a book for having distracting typo’s, but finally proclaimed that the book was; ‘... one that you will not be disappointed dispite the erros’......but then, who knows, maybe this had been deliberately done for a laugh? It certainly made me giggle. 




Rose Dee was born in Ingham, North Queensland, Australia. Her childhood experiences growing up in a small beach community would later provide inspiration for her first novel.
Rose, who holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree, decided to try her hand at writing two years ago. The result of that attempt is her first novel, Back to Resolution.
Her novels are inspired by the love of her coastal home and desire to produce exciting and contemporary stories of faith for women.
Beyond Resolution, and A New Resolution are the second and third books in the 'Resolution' series.
Rose’s debut novel Back to Resolution recently won Bookseller’s Choice at the Caleb Awards 2012.
She has also recently released The Greenfield Legacy, a collaborative novel, written in conjunction with three other outstanding Australian authors.
Rose resides in Mackay, North Queensland with her husband, young son, and mischievous pup, Noodle.

Visit Rose at: http://rosedee.com/


16 comments:

  1. Your/You're, write/right, about that LOL...
    We are a mad race. We have many silly words.. I ofter think butcher is a crazy one But/Cher...doesn't sound like somewhere to buy meat.
    Hugs Crystal

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    1. You are so right, Crystal. The English language is really strange. I see so many instances of this as I help Tully with his homework. Sometimes you just can't 'sound' it out.

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  2. Hi Rose,
    A deep tissue massage. I love that! You're bringing up a sensitive, thoughtful gentleman.
    I see such a lot of what you're talking about all the time. Maybe electronic media and 'text talk' is partly responsible. Once, I accidentally posted on Facebook from my teenage daughter's profile and she was horrified that her 'friends' would see the correct spelling and grammar and think mean things about her.

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    1. Yes, Paula. It was all I could do not to laugh out loud. He was so serious. He is a very thoughtful boy. I was aware though, that the attention was part of a ploy not to go to bed. But if he is to stay up late - let it be because he is looking after his old Mum. :)
      That is so true of teenagers, they abbreviate everything. Apparently it's 'cool' - but only because we adults can't decipher it.

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  3. Rose that is so funny - as is your story Paula. I guess all this reminds us how important it is to not judge others. I will never complain about a spelling error again after trying to get my 95,000 correct and failing :)

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    1. It's almost impossible to get it all 'perfect'. In fact, I was recently told the the large majority of first editions have mistakes. Let's hope that all our first editions sell out - then we can make any necessary touch-ups before reprinting. :)

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  4. Funny, Funny, Funny but oh, so true! You can often get away with the wrong word if spoken quickly. Ah, but when a reader has time to have second look...enuff sed.

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    1. Rita, sometimes I look so many times I find myself reading by remote control. That's when you know you need a fresh pair of eyes on the work.

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  5. Hi Rose,
    That was so cute to hear about your young Masseuse. Sounds very professional and very caring too! :) I think we human beings are only too prone to make mistakes. So we do well to be less judgemental on others, just like you said. I've often re-read what I've written and found some bloopers - and been shocked at my mistakes. The problem sometimes I think is that we read it assuming a word is there or that a word is spelt right - when the mistake is only too visible to someone who sees it with fresh eyes.

    Enuff said as Rita pointed out! :)
    Blessings,
    Anusha

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    1. So true, Anusha. Often when I am reading aloud to my friend she will stop me because I have said the wrong thing, or put in a word that wasn't even there. It is very helpful.

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  6. Ha Rose, your boy is so cute. Love that! But yes, your story makes me realise again how quick we are to judge in others the things we do ourselves. We are all human and all just as fallible as each other. :)

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    1. He is cute, and he makes me laugh all the time. He clearly has his mother's skill for using the incorrect word :)

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  7. What a cute story and great intro to your post. Thanks.

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    1. Thank you, Dale. It always pays to have a laugh - especially when I am owning up to my shortcomings.

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  8. That is so cute. And yes - I do that all the time. More than I would like, in fact.
    Iola and I often giggle over my mistakes. I think it is the hand going faster than the brain or something like it anyway. Thanks for sharing

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    1. I am certain there is a brain/hand connection there, Catherine. At least we can laugh - mostly because they are really funny. :) x

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